Zippy Lately (November 29 – December 5, 2010)

1. Gantz in the U.S.A

Gantz is one of those anime that I’ve been recommended for sometime; however, for whatever reason I have yet to take the time to watch the show. Perhaps I was worried about the graphic content, since Gantz I’ve heard is a pretty intense anime. Now though, whether I see the anime first or not, myself and many others in the United States are going to be able to watch the new Japanese live action film adaptation of Gantz. Thanks to Fathom Events, who brought Bleach, Death Note, and Eureka 7 to our theaters, in January 2011 we will be able to see Gantz live action on the big screen. If you’re a fan of Gantz should of course be major news; however, I feel even for those who, like myself, haven’t seen the show supporting such an event is an important step to ensure that other movies like this will also get brought over. To read more about this event check out ANN’s write-up.

Gantz Live Action Trailer

2. Manga’s Modernization

In the United States, Hulu, Netflix, FUNimation, and many other companies embraced the internet and delivered via the power of streaming anime and films to the extent that was never possible before. While anime distribution reflects our changing world, manga appears to be lagging behind. Yen Press, for the U.S., has been one of the only champions of modernized manga distribution, and even that has been a recent development.

Lately Japanese companies and creators have finally begun to embrace the internet more, as exemplified by Kodansha’s website revamp reveals.  What makes this particular announcement so exciting is that this will include an english component too. For english speaking fans, this should mean not only will you get your favorite Kodansha Morning series faster, but that you may also have access to manga series that has not been distributed in english yet. I’m excited that Kodansha is embracing modern distribution methods, and I am hopeful that more and more companies follow in their footsteps.

3. Christmas Shopping

So with Black Friday and Cyber Monday over you may have already finished all of your Christmas shopping. However, the sales are just beginning, and my favorite among them is RightStuf.com’s “12 Days of Christmas“. Of course, regardless of the sale prices, what is most important is the items for sale. So go check them out and if you have any money left find yourself some goodies.

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10 Changes ‘Anime’ Would Make to Thanksgiving

  1. Turkey would be served in sushi rolls.
  2. Thanksgiving parades would be replaced by school festivals.
  3. We’d celebrate the coming together of Britannians and Elevens.
  4. Robots would carve the turkey.
  5. Turduckens would actually be Transformers in disguise.
  6. A doe-eyed, eager-to-please moe girl would get up early to make all the food.
  7. Everyone would still weigh the same after the meal.
  8. Comical sword fights would erupt over who gets to break the wishbone.
  9. The skinniest character in the room will out eat everyone else.
  10. Party invites will emphasize “BYOP: Bring Your Own Pocky”

J-Dramas Enter the Third Dimension

According to a post on Yonasu.com, Japan is taking the leap into 3D television by producing the first ever 3D J-Drama. While I love J-Dramas, and generally am displeased with 3D films, I am certainly curious about this idea. What especially makes me want to see this 3D concept is the thought that when compared to American TV in particular J-Dramas tend to look less polished. I presume this is because the cameras used are lower grade. So when watching a J-Drama in 2D the look comes closer to fitting real life, so I wonder if a 3D drama will truly take advantage of the limited camera abilities by making the show jump out without too many ‘hollywood’ camera effect?

In regards to the plot itself, here’s what Yonasu.com has to say:

The drama is titled Tokyo Control and stars Ayako Kawahara and Saburo Tokito. The story revolves around life as a tower controller.

Conceptually I’m already interested because air traffic control centers aren’t typical fair for American dramas, and so I’m looking forward to hopefully learning about traffic control centers in general and in particular what Japanese airports are like.

While I’m not sure if I’ll end up liking the drama, or the 3D part especially, I’m at least willing to give it a try for when it comes out in January ’11. I’m sure I’ll have a more detailed write-up when we cover that season’s dramas, so look forward to that.